Mexican Supreme Court statement on landmark marriage ruling

This statement from the Mexican Supreme Court just came across explaining a little about what it meant last week when ruling that three same sex couples from Oaxaca have the right to marry. I’m on a bus and unable to translate it this second, but here it is in Spanish.

México D.F., a 5 de diciembre de 2012

INCONSTITUCIONAL QUE EN OAXACA MATRIMONIO TENGA COMO FIN PERPETUAR ESPECIE, ESO ATENTA CONTRA AUTODETERMINACIÓN DE PERSONAS Continue reading

The road ahead for gay marriage in Mexico

I noted yesterday that the Mexican Supreme Court ruling striking down Oaxaca’s gay marriage ban didn’t mean that same-sex couples will immediately be able to marry across Mexico. That’s because in the Mexican legal system it takes more than one ruling to force a general change in the law—this is a big difference from how the legal system works in the United States.

Geraldina de la Vega, one of the lawyers who worked on the Oaxacan suit, has a great explanation of what happens now at Animal Politico. It’s in Spanish, so here’s a summary:

The court’s ruling only applies to the three couples who filed suit—for now. The court said that the law defining marriage as between a man and a woman must be interpreted as between two people, and therefore the registrars must allow the three couples who filed suit to marry. Continue reading